Sermon Transcript

Good morning, fellowship.
It is so good to be with you this morning, and I want to say happy Mother’s Day again to all you mothers,
grandmothers, great-grandmothers, do we have any grandmothers or great-grandmothers in the room? A couple? Should we give it up for them?
Yeah.
And
spiritual mothers, you know the Bible talks in Titus 2 about this beautiful relationship
between ladies of one generation and the next generation and having a beautiful mentoring influential relationship for the Lord, and so if that’s you, if you’re a mother,
a grandmother, a great-grandmother, a spiritual mother, we just want you to know this morning that we love you and we’re so thankful for you, and actually it’s been my prayer request this morning that you would experience two things, that you would experience firstly just an
absolute outpouring of the love of Jesus for you from your children this day.
Hopefully you’ve already received maybe cards this morning, or did anyone get breakfast in bed this morning?
Yeah, a couple of people got breakfast in bed. Hopefully the red carpet was rolled out, but we just want you to know that your children love you, your church loves you, and that the Lord Jesus Christ loves you as we go to his word.
And then secondly, I’ve been praying that as you experience this outpouring of love,
this morning all of us would be encouraged to keep pouring out love upon those God has entrusted to your care,
and that’s been my prayer this morning. Now, speaking about an outpouring, I’ve got a little video I’m gonna show you on one of the screens here. It’s a video of a waterfall,
and it’s Niagara Falls, isn’t that beautiful this morning?
And we’re gonna play it on loop this morning, and you can just hear a little bit of water. Can you hear that?
We’re gonna keep playing that this morning just as a visual aid, and hopefully you’ll be able to hear the water through that, through this message. Now, I have to warn you, I did this one time in my church in Belfast,
and we kept this video on loop, and the water was running the whole way through the sermon, and this older lady came up to one of our elders at the end of the sermon and said, that was a great message from Tim, but I don’t know why. I had to go to the restroom like three times through the sermon. So I’ve been praying for the Spirit to move this morning, but if other things are moving through the sermon, and you need to go to the restroom, oh, we’ve already had somebody getting up.
So if you need to go to the restroom this morning,
you feel free. We will not hold it against you this morning.
But the reason I’ve got this on screen is I was reminded this week of an illustration from Dr. Tony Evans. Anybody love Dr. Tony Evans? Isn’t he amazing?
Yeah,
he’s incredible. And he told this illustration like 20 years ago, and I’ve never forgotten it, and it was about the Niagara Falls, and he said there’s three different ways you can see the falls.
You can book a hotel room, and you can open up in the morning your curtains,
your blinds, and you can see the falls from a distance, and it’s absolutely incredible.
This stunning,
overflowing,
never-ceasing waterfall, it’s absolutely magnificent as you see it in the distance.
But he said there’s a second way you can see the falls. You can come out of your hotel room,
go to a viewing point, and now you’re not only seeing the falls from a distance, but you’re hearing the falls.
And it’s absolutely mind-blowing. And then he said there’s a third way.
It’s not what you’re thinking. It’s to go over the top on a barrel. But there’s a third way that you can see the falls. It’s called the Lady of the Mist. I don’t know if anyone’s ever done this.
You can hop on board this boat, and there’s a captain on board, and he’s gonna take you down this river, closer and closer and closer and closer, all the way to the foot of the waterfall. And now you’re no longer seeing the waterfall from a distance or hearing it from a distance. Now you’re standing at the foot of the waterfall, underneath it, and you’re being soaked by it.
And I remember telling this illustration to one of my buddies in my church back in Belfast, this guy called Dave. He was helping us plan some sermons. We were preparing a sermon series on the love of God. And he said, Tim, that’s it, that’s it, that’s it. And I said, what’s it?
And he said, that is just like the love of Jesus Christ.
The love of Jesus Christ. Please hear me this morning. He said it to me, is like a stunning,
overflowing,
never-ceasing waterfall. But here’s what I want you to get this morning.
There may have been many times in your life when you have seen the love of Jesus poured out through the Scriptures,
or through other people’s lives, in other people’s lives, or even in your own life, but you may still be keeping yourself at a distance this morning. Or you may have heard of the love of Jesus all throughout your life,
but you may still
be keeping yourself at a distance this morning. You know what my prayer is this morning? That there is one person who wants to take you, namely the Holy Spirit this morning, wants to take you on a journey where you hop on board and he takes you closer and closer and closer and closer, right to the foot of the waterfall of Christ’s love this morning, and you allow him to pour out his stunning,
overflowing, never-ceasing love upon you this morning. Amen?
That is my prayer request. Now, why might you need to be encouraged by that this morning, mothers,
grandmothers, great-grandmothers, spiritual mothers, why might you need to be encouraged that Jesus loves you like this stunning,
overflowing, never-ceasing waterfall? Well,
perhaps this morning, or this year, or this last couple of weeks, or this last month you’ve been tired. Can I hear an amen from any mamas in the room, any tired mamas?
I was talking to Emily this week, and she was like, just take out the word perhaps.
I’m tired,
I’m definitely tired. You know that maybe you’re just trying to keep everything going. Maybe you’re working full-time, maybe it’s not an option for you not to work, and you’re full-time working, and you’re a full-time mom,
and you’re just trying to keep all of the balls in the air, and all of the plates spinning, and just trying to keep your kids alive, and you’re just trying to make sure the home functions and is centered on Christ, but it’s tiring.
You know that Barna, the research groups,
propose, or they studied this, and they have documented that one in three mothers in America consistently feel overwhelmed and tired.
And if that’s you this morning,
you know what I’m praying? I’m praying that the Spirit might take you to the foot of the waterfall of Christ’s love, that He sees you in your tiredness, and He knows your servant heart,
and He sees those
long days,
and He wants to pour out His love upon you this day and tell you,
you’re mine, and I love you with a stunning,
overflowing, never-ceasing kind of love.
Perhaps the truth is this has been a difficult year for you.
Perhaps it’s been a challenging year. Perhaps you’ve got a teenager, and we love teenagers.
We got any teenagers in the house?
We got any moody teenagers in the house?
Jesus loves you.
We sometimes struggle to love you, but Jesus loves you.
But perhaps you’ve had a challenging year, right? Parenting can be like a roller coaster. Can you hear an amen?
I mean, there’s tremendous highs, but there’s sometimes real lows,
and perhaps you’ve watched your child walk away from the things of God,
and that’s broken your heart this year.
Perhaps this morning, actually, there’s lots of emotions in the room. And I’m sure there’s lots of joy,
lots of gratitude to the Lord for His gift that He’s given you of family or friends.
But perhaps for some people, there’s a tinge of sorrow.
You’d love to be a mother,
but you’ve prayed for years, and as yet, that hasn’t happened.
And this is a hard morning for you.
Or perhaps you’re remembering your own mother,
who you love deeply,
and you wish she was here with you this day, and you miss her.
Well, if that’s you this morning, if that’s you, if you’re feeling tired, or have had a challenging year as a parent, or you felt overwhelmed in any way, or underappreciated, or you’ve had a tinge of sorrow in your soul this morning, it’s been my prayer this morning, and it is my prayer that you would be led to the place where you experience an absolute outpouring of the love of Jesus upon you, His child, this day,
and you’re encouraged to keep pouring out love upon those God has entrusted to your care.
And speaking of an outpouring, I want you to turn to John chapter 13. If you’ve got a Bible,
let’s go to John 13. We’ve been going through a series on John, and this is the next little section, and when I came across it again in preparation for this sermon, I thought, Lord, this is a beautiful message to speak over our mothers,
our grandmothers, our great-grandmothers, our spiritual mothers, but also all of us listening in this morning. So turn with me to John 13, and as you’re turning there,
I just want you to watch out for how Jesus pours out love upon His disciples in the upper room,
then how He pours out love upon the world on the cross.
And then at the end of our time this morning, we’re going to think about what difference that makes for our lives today. John chapter 13.
Has everybody got it?
Kids, you made sure your parents have turned there?
All right. John 13. Let’s read these amazing verses from John 13. It was just before the Passover festival,
and Jesus knew that the hour had come for Him to leave this world and go to the Father.
And having loved His own who were in the world, watch this,
He loved them to the end.
The evening meal was in progress, and the devil had already prompted Judas, the son of Simon Iscariot, to betray Jesus.
Watch this. Here’s the outpouring. Jesus knew that the Father had put all things under His power,
and that He had come from God and was returning to God, so He got up from the meal.
He took off His outer clothing,
and He wrapped a towel around His waist.
And after that,
He poured water into a basin,
and He began to wash His disciples’ feet,
drying them with the towel that was wrapped around Him.
I just want you to see, firstly,
as we think about this outpouring, I just want you to see that Jesus pours out stunning love upon His disciples as He washes their feet.
This is beautiful. He pours out stunning,
overflowing,
never-ceasing love upon His disciples,
His children,
His
closest followers on this night.
Remember what night this is. Do you remember? Can you kind of hit the side of your head and think,
what night is this occurring on?
This is Thursday night of Passion Week. Some people think it’s Wednesday night, but I lean more towards it’s Thursday night. It’s the night that Jesus is going to be handed over to be arrested. It’s the night before what?
His crucifixion.
Where would your mind be at?
Honestly, now, where would your mind be at if you knew within a matter of hours you’re going to be betrayed,
arrested,
kept up all night on trial, and then tomorrow morning experience a crucifixion?
Notice where Jesus’ mind is on what His heart is set upon.
It is stunning. On this night of all nights,
Jesus has His heart and mind set upon pouring out love on His own children.
You see this in these verses.
Verse one, it was just before the Passover feast, and Jesus knew that the time had come for Him to leave the world, and having loved, what’s that, having loved His own who were in the world, He now showed His own the full extent of His love, or right to the end He loved them.
Notice the language here, love.
It’s a Greek word for,
it’s a Greek word agape,
and you know that there’s a number of different
words for love in the Greek language. There’s phileo love,
which is the love of family members, which is a wonderful kind of love.
There’s storge love, which is the love of friends,
which is a wonderful kind of love. There’s eros love, which is the love between a husband and a wife, which is a beautiful kind of love. But this love, agape love, is on a whole different level to any of those kinds of loves.
This love is covenant love, please hear me.
This is not love based on emotions or circumstances.
You don’t fall into this and fall out of this kind of love, no. This is love based on a firm, unshakable, unbreakable commitment,
covenant choice on the inside that you’re never gonna break.
This is the kind of love Jesus has for His children.
And notice here, He wants to pour out this agape love upon His own children. Do you see that in verse one?
We’ve seen many times in the book of John that God so loved the world that He gave His only son. We’ve seen Jesus’ love be poured out on the world, on all types of people, on all different backgrounds, on all different regions, on all different groups of people. He’s loved the world, but here on this night, it’s like a mother hen gathering her little hens, her little chicks. It’s like a shepherd gathering the sheep, or a mother or a father gathering their little children. Come here, come here, come here. I want to bring you close because this night, you’re my own child.
You’re my own children. You’re my own closest followers and I just want to pour out my love on you because you belong to me and you’re my own children.
And notice He wants to pour out this agape love on His own children right to the end.
Some translations say in verse one, He now showed them the full extent of His love because you could understand this phrase or this word telos in Greek as meaning He wants to love them to the uttermost.
And if that’s true, that’s beautiful. He wants to show them the full extent of His love, but I lean towards telos being understood as He wants to love them right to the end.
Why? Because John 13, this verse is a pivot here in John.
It’s like Jesus has closed the door of the upper room and He’s dimmed the lights and He’s zeroing in on being with His disciples and zeroing in,
focusing on going to the cross.
Everything from 13 through to 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 is all going to the cross.
You know what Jesus is saying here or what John is recording?
Nothing’s going to stop the love of Jesus for His children.
Nothing.
He’s going to love His children right here as He serves them. He’s going to love them as He teaches them. He’s going to love them as He prays for them and He’s going to love them as He goes on trial for them. He’s going to love them as He goes to the cross for Him.
Nothing can stop the love of Jesus. That well will never grow dry.
And Jesus is going to love His children right to the end, no matter what.
And so watch what happens. It’s beautiful. Here’s the outpouring.
The evening meal wasn’t ready in place, verse 2, and normally there would have been a servant who would come and wash the feet of the dinner guests. You know this, but the servant didn’t turn up that night.
So watch what happens.
Verse 4,
He got up to serve. He stepped up to serve.
It’s a simple observation, but when no one else stepped up,
Jesus stepped up.
Jesus steps up to serve when no one else steps up to serve and notice what happens next. Verse 4,
He got up from the meal.
He took off His outer clothing. Now just pause right there.
Think about that for a second. He takes off His outer robes and He’s reduced to an undergarment.
Dwight Pentecost, a long-time professor at Dallas Seminary, has done some great research here,
and he maintains that Jesus probably had a rabbi’s robe. It’s not 100% clear in the text, but culturally, historically,
rabbis often wore robes. Certainly Jesus,
every time He went to a synagogue, was recognized at a distance as being the
rabbi, because rabbis often wore robes with tassels on them,
and we think even when He went to the cross, the garment that was taken off Him was a seamless robe,
and seamless robes out of one loom would have cost a lot of money,
and maybe somebody who was prominent or who had wealth made this robe for Him.
And Pentecost says he believes Jesus had a rabbi’s robe, which spoke of His leadership, His position.
And if that’s true, do you see what’s happening here?
You tracking, fellowship?
He takes off everything that speaks of His position, His power,
His rulership. He strips Himself of that which speaks of His position.
The word here, to lay aside His robe,
His garment,
is the same word that will be used to speak of Jesus laying down His life on the cross.
And He’s standing there in just an undergarment,
which was the dress code of whom?
A poor common slave.
Because slaves,
servants,
the poor, they couldn’t afford an undergarment, so they would walk the streets just in a simple undergarment, and here’s Jesus embracing the dress code of a poor common slave.
And He not only embraces the dress code of a slave,
He embraces the posture of servitude.
And He’s got up, watch this, it’s a very simple observation. It says He’s got up from the meal, and then the next verse says,
He’s at their feet, washing their feet.
He stoops to serve.
Watch that, take note of that. The King of kings,
the Lord of lords,
is at the feet of humanity,
serving them in love.
Isn’t it beautiful?
And having embraced the posture of servitude,
He pours out love upon them in a stunning act of self-sacrificial servitude.
Watch what happens.
Verse 5,
after that, John writes, He poured water into a basin, and He began to wash His disciples’ feet, drying them with the towel that was wrapped around Him.
Please note that He pours out love upon them in the most practical,
beautiful ways,
even when the task was unlovely.
Right?
I mean, how many people in here enjoy being next to someone who has smelly feet?
Right? Any kids in here, any kids got a daddy who sometimes has smelly feet? You’re not allowed to say if your mommy sometimes has smelly feet, because it’s Mother’s Day. But if your daddy sometimes has smelly feet, you can raise their hand, because I hate smelly feet.
I mean, I just can’t stand it.
It makes me want to gag.
No one enjoys washing someone else’s feet.
It’s an unlovely task, but please note this. Please think about this.
The disciples wouldn’t have had socks or enclosed shoes. They would have been wearing sandals.
Through the dusty streets of Jerusalem, maybe walking all day, tired, bruised,
certainly dirty feet.
Maybe even smelling disgusting feet.
Certainly in need of deep cleansing feet.
And you know what Jesus does?
These dirty,
disgusting,
in need of deep cleansing feet.
One foot by one,
24 feet.
He stoops to serve,
and even though the task was unlovely, he pours out water and cleanses these deeply dirty,
disgusting,
in need of deep cleansing feet.
What love.
And please note that he did not just pour out love,
even when the task was unlovely, but he poured out love even when the recipients were seemingly unlovable.
It never fails to move me. Please look at your text here.
It never fails to move me when we read in verse 5,
he began to wash his disciples’
feet.
Because who’s in that group,
fellowship?
I’ll tell you who’s in that group. There’s a group of guys who Luke tells us have just been arguing,
fighting, and in this very moment over who’s the greatest, who will be the greatest in the kingdom. No, no, I’m better.
No, I’m the greatest. No, I,
who are you? I am worthy of double honor.
These disciples who don’t even get it, that on the eve of the crucifixion, all they can think about is themselves. These disciples who,
in a matter of hours, all of them will flee.
After everything he’s done for them, all of them will flee.
Peter’s here.
Peter who will declare, I will never abandon you. I will give my life to you. Even if I have to die, he will deny Jesus three times and even call down curses that he didn’t even know the man.
And who else is in this group?
Judas is
in this group.
And Jesus looks into the eyes of Judas and the rest of the disciples and says, come here, Judas, come here.
Come here.
I want to wash your feet because my love, get this, my love is stunning.
It overflows and it never ceases and nothing can stop my love as I pour it out upon you, my own children, this night.
You know what I’m convinced of, fellowship?
Please hear me now. Mothers,
grandmothers,
great grandmothers, spiritual mothers, and all of us listening in whether young or old, you know what I’m convinced of? If you are in Christ this morning, if you are one of Jesus’ own children, you’re in his family, you know what I’m convinced of? If you were there that night in that room, he would have called you into that circle and looked at you in your eyes, no matter what you’ve done,
no matter how many times you’ve denied him or betrayed him or fled from faithfulness to him. No matter what you’ve done, he would have looked into your eyes and my eyes and said, come here. Come here, my child. I want to pour out my love on you because my love for you is like a stunning, overflowing, never-ending, never-ceasing waterfall and you can’t stop it and I’m going to pour it out upon you, my child, this night.
Please know that Jesus pours out stunning love upon the disciples that night as he washes their feet. Here’s the second thing, just very briefly, that I want you to know,
that Jesus not only pours out stunning love upon his disciples that night as he washes their feet, but this actually is a picture and a metaphor and a symbol of what he’s going to do the very next day, because Jesus pours out stunning love on the cross as he dies for the sins of the world.
Jesus pours out stunning,
overflowing,
never-ceasing love upon the world as he dies for the sins
And that’s what happens here next in this text. If you were to look down just briefly from verse 6 through to verse 11, now, just because of time, I’ll not read it or unpack it deeply, but I just want to summarize it for you.
You get this conversation between Peter and Jesus and the key verse, if you’re just to look at it,
the key verse for interpreting this next little section is verse 7. Jesus says, you don’t realize what’s happening now. There’s something happening right now,
but you will understand later. Something will happen later. In other words, Peter, what I’ve just done to you right now is a visual demonstration and metaphor of what I’m going to do for you and the world tomorrow, later.
Peter,
I’ve poured out, watch this, I’ve poured out water tonight, now,
to wash your feet,
but tomorrow, later, on the cross, I’m going to pour out my blood to wash your soul.
Peter,
I have stepped up to serve now, but tomorrow, I’m going to be lifted up on a cross.
Peter, I have been reduced and stripped now, but tomorrow,
I’m going to not regard equality with God as something to be grasped, but I’m going to humble myself and pour myself out and be stripped to nothing, even taking on the appearance of a slave, and I’m going to be obedient unto death.
Peter, I’ve poured out water upon your dirty,
disgusting, in need of deep cleansing feet, but tomorrow,
later, I’m going to pour out my life to cleanse you of your dirty,
disgusting,
rebellious, in need of deep cleansing souls.
Peter, I’ve poured out agape love right to the end tonight,
and tomorrow, for the sins of the world, I’m going to pour out agape love right to the end, and nothing is going to stop me.
The hymn writer said these words.
I took a little screenshot of them on my phone, because I couldn’t stop thinking about them. It’s an old hymn. It says, here is love,
vast as the ocean, loving kindness as the flood,
when the prince of life, our ransom, shed for us his precious blood.
Who his love fellowship will not remember?
Who can cease to sing his praise? He can never be forgotten throughout heaven’s eternal days.
On the mount of crucifixion,
fountains opened deep and wide, watch this,
through the flood gates of God’s mercy flowed a vast and gracious tide,
grace and love like mighty rivers,
poured incessant from above,
and heaven’s peace and perfect justice kissed the guilty world in love.
He loves you, fellowship.
He poured out stunning love upon the disciples that night, and I’m convinced that if you’d been there, he would have called you in and poured out love upon you in exactly the same way. But I’m absolutely convinced of this, that when he went to the cross that day, he poured out love upon you and upon the world, because Jesus’ love is like a stunning,
overflowing, never ceasing waterfall.
Last thing I want you to note is that Jesus provides a stunning model for us,
striking,
stunning,
challenging model for us, which shakes us up and grabs our attention by which we are called to live out this kind of love.
As we experience an outpouring of love at the foot of the waterfall,
he calls us, if we are truly his followers, to go pour out that kind of love upon our children, upon all those under our sphere of influence, upon all those God has entrusted to our care.
Notice the next couple of verses here in John chapter 13, verse 12.
Let me just read them to you.
When he had finished washing their feet, verse 12, he put on his clothes and he returned to his place.
Do you understand what I have done for you, he asked him?
You call me teacher and Lord, and rightly so, for that is what I am.
Now that I, your Lord and teacher, have washed your feet, watch this, you should also wash one another’s feet.
I have set you an example that you should do as I have done for you. I tell you the truth, no servant is greater than his master, nor is a messenger greater than the one who sent him. Now that you know these things, you will be blessed if you do them.
Later in John 13, he says, a new command I give you,
love one another.
As I have loved you,
as I have poured out incessant love upon you,
so you must love one another. By this will all men know.
By this will all of your family members know.
By this will your colleagues at work know. By this will your community in your streets know. By this will the city of Dallas and the nation of America, or the world, know that you are my followers, that you are my children.
If you love one another like I have loved you,
and I want to say to you, particularly mothers,
the spiritual mothers and grandmothers and great grandmothers, if you are tired this morning, if you’re facing burnout,
come to the foot of the waterfall this day and open up your heart and ask the Spirit to form in you love like Christ.
If you’re facing a difficult moment in your parenting, if you’ve had a difficult year, if this morning has stirred up all kinds of emotions, whether for good or for not so good,
come and receive the Lord Jesus’ love for you this day. Let Him pour it out on you,
but make it your prayer this morning that you would open up fully to the work of the Spirit who wants to form in you the life and likeness of Christ, and that includes loving people with agape love right to the end, with a stunning, overflowing, never ceasing kind of love.
Step up to serve when no one else is stepping up to serve.
Embrace a posture of servanthood,
even though at times it feels humiliating or no one else is doing it.
Pour out love upon your children and those whom God has entrusted to your care, even when the task is unlovely, and even when the recipients become seemingly unlovable.
For there and there alone,
you will never be more like the Lord Jesus Christ.
And as I think of that type of love being poured out in human relationships,
I can now think of my wife.
I’m going to embarrass her a little bit this morning as I close.
I’m going to brag on her.
Because yesterday was our graduation at DTS, and it reminded me of when we graduated in 2008. And my wife, Kerry, actually in 2008 won two awards from DTS. One of them was she was the first female to win the Dwight Pentecost Award for Bible Exposition Studies. And I thought to myself, she’s not only beautiful, she’s not only the only girl who laughs at my jokes,
she’s absolutely smart,
incredibly intelligent.
And we graduated and we walked out of that Prestonwood or Preston World as we called it. We walked out of that building when we graduated in 2008, and we were just ready to change the world. Lord, we’ll go anywhere for you, we’ll serve anywhere.
And the Lord led us to a little ministry right on the north coast of Northern Ireland.
And they gave me a job, but they didn’t give a job to Kerry. They gave her an internship, and she said, well, I’m willing to serve, I’ll be an intern.
And there were lovely people there, but the boss that she was working for, basically, I think, in my opinion, took everything that he didn’t want to do on his desk and just said, Kerry, here’s your internship.
And that included, chiefly, the running and the cleaning of a retreat center for 50 to 60 people,
who every weekend, young people would come and stay in this retreat center and we’d try to pour into them and tell them about Jesus and see them come to the Lord.
And then on the Monday and Tuesday following the retreat of young people,
it was Kerry’s job in her internship to clean, to change all the bed sheets,
to Hoover vacuum the floor, and then to clean the toilets.
And parents, you know that if you’ve got teenagers, I mean, hygiene is not on high level priority for teenagers on a weekend away. And so there she was,
top of her class at DTS,
just a few months before.
On a Monday and Tuesday when no one else was in the building,
no one else in the whole world knew she was there or seemed to care she was there, and she was on her knees,
scrubbing the inside of these toilets,
one after another.
I remember talking to her at the end of the year, we were walking on the beach,
and the wind was blowing through her hair.
And she turned to me and as we looked back on that year, she said, you know what, Tim, that was a hard year.
It was really tough.
But she said,
I learned more about being a servant this year than I did in four years at seminary.
And I responded to her, these words came out of my mouth on the beach that day, and you know what, Kerry?
I don’t think you’ve ever been more like Jesus than on those Monday and Tuesdays each week of this year.
Oh,
fellowship,
no matter what he’s asking of you,
where he’s gonna lead you,
who he’s entrusted to your care, no matter how unlovely the task or how much it demands of you to stoop or lay aside your rights or your dreams or your privileges,
no
matter how seemingly unlovable the recipients,
pour out love.
Come to the foot of the waterfall this day and let Jesus’ love be poured out upon you for it is a stunning, never-ceasing,
overflowing love, you know.
And then go hand-in-hand with the Spirit and pour out that kind of Christ-like agape love upon your world,
for there you will never be more like Jesus.
Let’s pray together.
Father, we come before you this morning and we thank you so much for these wonderful families and these children and grandchildren and great -grandchildren and these wonderful parents,
mothers,
grandmothers, great-grandmothers, spiritual mothers, fathers,
grandfathers, influencers, uncles,
nephews,
aunts,
nieces.
Thank you for this family gathered here today.
We pray that you might so fill our hearts and lives with the love of Jesus that it might be overflowing from us and that fellowship might be known in the city of Dallas and around this nation as a place that is soaked with the love of Christ,
so much so that it bursts forth upon everyone and anyone for the glory of God so that all might know the stunning love of Jesus who went to the cross.
This we pray in Christ’s name,
and all God’s people said,
Amen.

 

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